Applications

Introducing TruBLOCK™, A Revolution in Taste Modulation

TruBLOCK™ is our newest and most powerful taste modulation product. Derived from our patent pending process that produces innovative, all-natural ingredients, TruBLOCK™ combines both our Reactive and Modulating technologies. This approach enables your products to achieve the best taste possible while still supporting your clean label needs. Our proprietary, reactive process enables TruBLOCK™ to bind with the negative tasting compounds in your application making them undetectable to the tongue. TruBLOCK™ then drops off in the digestive system resulting in no effect on your application’s bioavailability.

Available in various concentrations to meet all your application needs.

SIMPLE, NATURAL, CLEAN LABEL INGREDIENTS BUILD A CLEANER TASTE PROFILE

TruBLOCK™ is listed as a Natural Flavor.

Please visit tastesnatural.com to request your complimentary sample.

Diet Is the Leading Cause of Mortality in the United States

Junk Food

Tastes Natural is dedicated to improving the health of all of us by providing all natural sugar and sodium replacement that tastes as good as the originals.  Our mission is growing in importance as more and more studies confirm that what we eat is the cause of our largest health issues.  This New York Times article summarizes how our diet is the leading cause of death in the United States.

Our Food Is Killing Too Many of Us

Improving American nutrition would make the biggest impact on our health care.

By Dariush Mozaffarian and Dan Glickman

Mr. Mozaffarian is dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Mr. Glickman was the secretary of agriculture from 1995 to 2001.

The Democratic debate on health care has to date centered around who should be covered and who should pay the bill. That debate, which has been going on for decades, has no clear answers and cannot be easily resolved because of two fundamental realities: Health care is expensive, and Americans are sick.

Americans benefit from highly trained personnel, remarkable facilities and access to the newest drugs and technologies. Unless we eliminate some of these benefits, our health care will remain costly. We can trim around the edges — for example, with changes in drug pricing, lower administrative costs, reductions in payments to hospitals and providers, and fewer defensive and unnecessary procedures. These actions may slow the rise in health care spending, but costs will keep rising as the population ages and technology advances.

And Americans are sick — much sicker than many realize. More than 100 million adults — almost half the entire adult population — have pre-diabetes or diabetes. Cardiovascular disease afflicts about 122 million people and causes roughly 840,000 deaths each year, or about 2,300 deaths each day. Three in four adults are overweight or obese. More Americans are sick, in other words, than are healthy.

Instead of debating who should pay for all this, no one is asking the far more simple and imperative question: What is making us so sick, and how can we reverse this so we need less health care? The answer is staring us in the face, on average three times a day: our food.

Poor diet is the leading cause of mortality in the United States, causing more than half a million deaths per year. Just 10 dietary factors are estimated to cause nearly 1,000 deaths every day from heart disease, stroke and diabetes alone. These conditions are dizzyingly expensive. Cardiovascular disease costs $351 billion annually in health care spending and lost productivity, while diabetes costs $327 billion annually. The total economic cost of obesity is estimated at $1.72 trillion per year, or 9.3 percent of gross domestic product.

These human and economic costs are leading drivers of ever-rising health care spending, strangled government budgets, diminished competitiveness of American business and reduced military readiness.

Fortunately, advances in nutrition science and policy now provide a road map for addressing this national nutrition crisis. The “Food Is Medicine” solutions are win-win, promoting better well-being, lower health care costs, greater sustainability, reduced disparities among population groups, improved economic competitiveness and greater national security.

Some simple, measurable improvements can be made in several health and related areas. For example, Medicare, Medicaid, private insurers and hospitals should include nutrition in any electronic health record; update medical training, licensing and continuing education guidelines to put an emphasis on nutrition; offer patient prescription programs for healthy produce; and, for the sickest patients, cover home-delivered, medically tailored meals. Just the last action, for example, can save a net $9,000 in health care costs per patient per year.

Taxes on sugary beverages and junk food would help lower health care costs.

Taxes on sugary beverages and junk food can be paired with subsidies on protective foods like fruits, nuts, vegetables, beans, plant oils, whole grains, yogurt and fish. Emphasizing protective foods represents an important positive message for the public and food industry that celebrates and rewards good nutrition. Levels of harmful additives like sodium, added sugar and trans fat can be lowered through voluntary industry targets or regulatory safety standards.

Nutrition standards in schools, which have improved the quality of school meals by 41 percent, should be strengthened; the national Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program should be extended beyond elementary schools to middle and high schools; and school garden programs should be expanded. And the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which supports grocery purchases for nearly one in eight Americans, should be leveraged to help improve diet quality and health.

The private sector can also play a key role. Changes in shareholder criteria (e.g., B-Corps, in which a corporation can balance profit versus purpose with high social and environmental standards) and new investor coalitions should financially reward companies for tackling obesity, diabetes and other diet-related illness. Public-private partnerships should emphasize research and development on best agricultural and food-processing practices. All work sites should demand healthy food when negotiating with cafeteria vendors and include incentives for healthy eating in their wellness benefits.

Coordinated federal leadership and funding for research is also essential. This could include, for example, a new National Institute of Nutrition at the National Institutes of Health. Without such an effort, it could take many decades to understand and utilize exciting new areas, including related to food processing, the gut microbiome, allergies and autoimmune disorders, cancer, brain health, treatment of battlefield injuries and effects of nonnutritive sweeteners and personalized nutrition.

Government plays a crucial role. The significant impacts of the food system on well-being, health care spending, the economy and the environment — together with mounting public and industry awareness of these issues — have created an opportunity for government leaders to champion real solutions.

Yet with rare exceptions, the current presidential candidates are not being asked about these critical national issues. Every candidate should have a food platform, and every debate should explore these positions. A new emphasis on the problems and promise of nutrition to improve health and lower health care costs is long overdue for the presidential primary debates and should be prominent in the 2020 general election and the next administration.

Great Tasting Drinks Without The Sugar

Harvard researchers say soda and sports drinks increase risk of dying from heart disease and breast and colon cancers

Studies continue to show how bad sugar is for you but it tastes so good.  Now you can have a sweet beverage that’s good for you by using TruSugr.
TruSugar uses Stevia, TruClear and TruSweet to get the sweetness of sugar without the calories while still being all natural.
Hibiscus orange coconut water is a great, refreshing drink on a warm day.  Who needs sugar?  Contact Nancy at [email protected] to learn how you can get rid of your added sugars without compromising tastes or cost.

The Challenge of Reducing Sodium

Even if a consumer did not add table salt to their meals, it is nearly impossible in today’s food environment for anybody to consume less than the recommended intake of salt set by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Despite the FDA releasing voluntary sodium reduction target ranges for commercially processed foods, the market lacks the ingredients to allow these products to remain appealing to the consumer while reducing sodium.

Our mission is simple, provide the industry with both low sodium and sodium free salt substitutes that have both the taste and quality that their customers demand.

TruSalt provides up to 100% sodium reduction in all applications and Ancient Sea Salt provides all the benefits of Sea Salt with 75% reduced sodium. Please contact Tastes Natural for more information and to request samples.

Sugar Free Tequila Chocolate Pyramids

Sugar free candy has historically not been good enough to appeal to the mass consumer market.  Collaborating with a major Stevia producer, Tastes Natural worked together to develop a truly world class chocolate candy that is also sugar free.  After some development, the Tequila Chocolate Pyramid was born.

Using TruClear and TruSweet together with Stevia, our partner was able to provide a dark chocolate confection with all the flavor and sweetness of candy but without the sugar.

Tastes Natural is working with Stevia to provide zero calorie sweetness to consumer products in most categories. Our Tru products are combined with Stevia to provide a concentrated sweetener with up to 300x the sweetness of sugar without the negative taste of pure Stevia. For more information or to ask for samples and usage guidelines, please contact Tastes Natural.

Sugary Drinks Increase Risk of Heart Disease

This shows the terrible effect of sugar on the human body.  In order to help counter act this, we have developed  TruSugr, an all natural, clean label sugar replacement based on Stevia.

Please contact us for a sample.http://www.tastesnatural.com/contact

 

Harvard researchers say soda and sports drinks increase risk of dying from heart disease and breast and colon cancers

KEY POINTS
  • The more sugary drinks a person drinks, the greater their risk of dying from heart disease, the study finds.
  • Sweet beverages were associated with a moderately higher risk of dying from breast cancer or colon cancer.
  • The study adds to a growing body of research on how sugary drinks may negatively affect one’s health.
GP: Coca-Cola Pepsi vending machines soda pop sales
Coca-Cola Co. and Pepsi Co. soda machines stand in a shopping center parking lot in Jasper, Indiana.
Luke Sharrett | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Drinking soda, sports drinks and other sugary beverages increases the risk of dying from heart disease and some types of cancers, according to new research.

Harvard researchers found that the more sweetened beverages a person drank, the greater their risk of dying from heart disease. In a study published Monday in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation, they also found sugary drinks were associated with a moderately higher risk of dying from breast cancer or colon cancer.

Drinking artificially sweetened drinks did not produce the same effects. However, women who drank more than four diet beverages per day died at a higher rate than other groups, particularly from heart disease. Lead author Vasanti Malik warned that this statistic might be inflated because people could have switched from drinking regular soda.

Researchers also found that swapping sugary drinks for diet versions could moderately reduce a person’s risk of death, though they still recommend that people drink water. The study adds to a growing body of research suggesting that sugary drinks can cause people to gain weight and possibly lead to a slew of health conditions, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

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“The big picture is really starting to emerge,” said Malik, a research associate at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “This is not random. There’s a whole lot of consistency across these findings.”

Added sugars should make up less than 10 percent of the total calories a person consumes per day, according to federal health guidelines. For a person consuming 2,000 calories per day, that equates to no more than 200 calories. The average can of soda contains 150 calories, or 75 percent of a person’s daily allowance.

Researchers found that for every additional sugary drink a person consumed, their risk of dying from heart disease increased by 10 percent. Malik said while the optimal amount of sweet drinks a person should drink is “zero,” the risk of drinking one or two per week would probably be small or undetectable.

The observational study tracked data from nearly 120,000 men and women over the course of three decades. Researchers adjusted for anything that could affect the results, such as diet and lifestyle factors. Regardless, they acknowledged residual effects may have altered the findings.

The American Beverage Association, which represents the nation’s biggest soda makers, said soft drinks are safe to consume “as part of a balanced diet.”

“We don’t think anyone should overconsume sugar, that’s why we’re working to reduce the sugar people consume from beverages across the country,” William Dermody said in an email.

 

Making Medicine Taste Better

Our client is a large supplier of cough drops, throat drops, soft chews and other dosage forms for consumer healthcare products in the private-label and contract manufacturing industries.They were developing a sucker for children that included Chlorpheniramine Maleate to reduce allergy symptoms in an easy to use application. Despite using sugar, the bitterness from the active ingredient was overpowering.

TruClear was the only product that was able to block the bitterness.

By adding TruClear into their formulation, our client was able to launch a previously impossible product into the market.

Please contact Tastes Natural  for more information on TruClear and to request a sample.

Taking the Burn out of CBD

Our client is developing a CBD water including terepenes for sale through retail as well as online.  They tried a few options to mask the flavor but nothing worked well enough for a lightly flavored water drink.

TruClear and TruSweet utilized in combination totally blocked the negative tastes and burning of the CBD.

With a neutral base of CBD with Terepenes, the client has been able to focus on the right flavors for the market and is in pre production.

Contact Tastes Natural for more information and to request a free sample of TruClear and TruSweet.

 

How to reduce sugar by 85%

 

Our client is a global leader in shaved ice operations with 1,600 franchises. Their franchisees sell at school sponsored events making nutrition an important consideration in their syrup offering. The client was seeking a sugar reduction in their product with a target of a 40% reduction while adding nutraceuticals to increase overall nutrition. Subsequently, their goal was to design a secondary offering that reduced sugar by 75% while making fruit a primary ingredient.

Solution:

Utilizing both TruSweet and TruClear, sugar was reduced by 85% without any difference in taste panels.

This was completed while also masking the off notes from the nutraceuticals.

Contact Tastes Natural to receive a free sample for commercial sugar reduction & flavor enhancing applications. We look forward to speaking with you.